Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Back in Print

A Pickwick Independent Press member (and friend) at work.

My work station - using Lisbeth's snowflakes as stencils, I'm etching a copper plate and a zinc plate with sugarlift...



This sugarlift recipe is sugar, Ivory Snow, and India Ink. Yesterday a couple of people in the print shop told me that you can use straight condensed milk! I have to try that...

Lisa Pixley at work.



Lisa's exquisite new bird prints.

Bulletin board paper doll lovers from a local gallery.


Those of us in The Artist Studio who have been pining to print are incredibly lucky! Lisa Pixley spearheaded the creation of a spanking new print shop in our building that is now in full operation, Pickwick Independent Press. I haven't done any intaglio since my senior year at MECA in 2006, and I am very excited to have access to a press again! I have started to experiment with transferring Lisbeth's cut paper designs to copper and zinc. There are several ways to do this, and I believe I will eventually attempt them all, but I'm starting with the very direct sugarlift process. This afternoon I will be putting the hard ground on these plates and putting them in the acid bath. I heard yesterday that you can put your plates in the ocean, and it will etch like an acid bath! I think you'd have to leave them in a long time, maybe several days...I really like this idea...

5 comments:

Susan Beauchemin said...

Nice! Printing again! Can't wait to see the results!

my name is michael said...

That print shop sounds like heaven! I an anxious to see your results and those bird prints are quite spectacular! Ahhh, I miss printmaking, letting the ocean etch your plates sounds pretty dang amazing.

KaHolly said...

That technique you are using with the snowflakes looks very interesting! Um, are those dead birds? ~karen

Begnaud said...

Good to see, and way over my head!

Dean Grey said...

Martha!

Fun! Fun! Fun!

I wish I were there with all of you creating the day away!

How does Lisa keep her prints so clean though? I mean, how does she get the paint/ink to stay just on the etching and not on parts of the background?

Just curious!

-Dean